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Posts Tagged ‘flood’

High water, 5/09

The river has pretty much crested and now it’s a matter of waiting for the water to recede.  Of course, all bets are off if we receive any more sustained downpours.  I know this is only anecdotal, but it seems everything is a weather event these days.  What ever happened to the gentle, soaking rains free of high winds and hail?  high water, 5/09

 

The river may be muddy, but I do love the clarity of the air after a big storm moves through the valley.  It’s air as it should be, which is more than we can say about the water.  All manner of artificial debris is floating around with the bark rolled off the logs.  I bet I’ve seen ten plastic barrels go by the last three days.  Lots of people have been curious about the river and for the most part the fishing has been good too.  I’m getting that feeling that the spring migration is coming to a close and I can concentrate on making art again.

Styrofoam cache, 5/09

The above image is the largest of three caches of polystyrene foam I have hidden in the woods prior to this flood.  It doesn’t matter now because I’m sure that most of this is gone.  This site was swamped by water and I might come across some of this stuff later.  I was hoping to make a few more larger figures, but I will have to wait.  I will wager that since I started this project I have lost over a dozen such collections to the river.  As much of this stuff as I have removed from the park…there will always be more after the next inundation.wildflower reflections, 5/09

 

For now, I will explore what else the park has to offer and see if a few stray migratory birds have lingered in the interior.  I’m still hoping to see that pelican again.  The water will recede and the land will dry out.  The landscape will be rearranged and the drama of change is part of the fun…that and checking out the latest oddities to be washed up in the park.  As for the Styrofoam, what was lost is too easily replaced.floating Styrofoam, 5/09

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rising river, 5/09

rising river 5/09

It’s been raining upriver from us and so what happens in the northeast eventually flows down.  More rain is expected and so it wouldn’t surprise me to see the water completely cover the fixed wier dam that forms the park’s eastern boundry.  Massive piles of driftwood and debris are getting ready to flood the area under the Conrail Railroad Bridge.  Every time the river rises the landscape of the park gets rearranged and creates new novelties.  I was looking over recent images and found I had taken several shots of tree roots that speak not only of the power of water, but the tenacity of trees as well. 

black willow roots, 4/09

These are the roots from a black willow tree.  This is an amazingly tough tree that grows in the poorest soil (essentially clay mud and sand) and frequently gets completely submerged during a flood.

cottenwood roots, 5/09

The writhing roots from a cottonwood tree.  At the moment, fluff from these trees is drifting like dry snow through the air.

tree roots, 4/09

I believe this is a cottonwood tree as well.  I marvel at how the river will undermine a tree along the bank.  In places, canopies are created and you can sit underneath the roots of a tree which comes in handy when it rains or on very hot days. 

roots and frayed barge rope, 5/09

All these exposed roots are good catch-alls for whatever the river sends their way.  This tree has snagged a bit of frayed barge rope or cable.  Originally, these ropes are about as thick around as a man’s forearm.  The river has no problem dealing with them.  We will see how high the river gets.  I’m looking forward to making new works in this rearranged environment.

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